“As Jack’s father, Sir Anthony, Brad Baron was imperious, yet warm.”

-TheaterScene.net, “The Rivals,” 2014

Reviews

“Just as Man of La Mancha is a difficult play to pigeonhole, it is also a very difficult play to perform. The actor portraying Cervantes/Don Quixote/Alonso Quiana needs a baritone/bass voice that can fill a theater, yet can alternate from a middle aged poet to a madman who think’s he’s a knight to a pathetic old man. This puts a huge burden on the actor playing the role. The young Brad Baron pulls it off admirably, handling the Cervantes and the elderly Quixote/Quiana characters with impressive skill (along with an excellent operatic baritone). His performance of “The Quest (The Impossible Dream)”, a song that has become a standard and done to death, is well nuanced, and performed to fit the scene, making it seem fresh once again. His acting skills are especially evident in his encounter with the Knight of Mirrors…Of the other parts, the performance that stands out is Brian James Grace’s performance of the Padre…The outer trial is about faith vs. reason, with the Padre being the voice of faith. Grace’s excellent acting and wonderful voice earned him, short of Brad Baron’s standing ovation, the strongest applause at the curtain calls…”

 

“Steven Faulk’s Vogel, Christopher Cobbett’s Kuppelweiser, and Brad Baron’s Moritz von Schwind made quite a threesome and carried a great deal of the action throughout the performance. Their voices were strong and projected well.”
ClevelandClassical.com, Ohio Light Opera: Blossom Time

“[Adelaide’s] fiancé of 14 years is Nathan Detroit, the most endearing of Manhattan con men. The lanky Brad Baron plays him with a thick New York accent and perpetual look of exasperation that suits the guy beautifully.”

Joining Brian and Knox are newcomers Brad Baron and Alexa Devlin, who make spectacular debuts as Detroit and Adelaide, respectively. Baron, who hails from New Jersey has no problem with the classic New York accent. In fact, he sounds a bit like Ray Romano and displays many of the famous actor’s same innate comedic traits onstage — and the guy can sing, too. He’s a complete package, and fun to watch.”

Brad Baron was the quintessential Nathan Detroit: a pasty, shady Broadway character with a good heart and a multitude of creative excuses. Although his songs can be spoken rather than sung, Baron had the vocal goods and let them show.”

“‘Homochondria’ by Brad Baron and directed by Michelle Leroy is an over-the-top burlesque concerning the cursed [Xander, Casey Hibbert], his long-suffering partner, [Ross, Joe Plambeck], and a Ghost of Divas Past and Present (Heidi Bennett). The result is good, silly fun.”

“Also outstanding was the pirate king, Brad Baron, who possesses a strong baritone voice. He’s seriously pursuing a singing career – as he should. Unusually good actor, too.”

Don Alfonso was sung with warm tone and easy phrasing by Brad Baron, who also was committed to characterizing the man as leering, cynical, and exploitative.”

Sung by bass-baritone, Brad Baron, Don Alfonso was a definite highlight in this production. Baron drew from his Gilbert and Sullivan experience to deliver dialogue with a consistent and committed intent. On the whole, Baron sang with a balanced richness and youthful vitality that worked quite well given the concept.”

Brad Baron as Robert Baker is empathetic as a man who might be in love with one of the sisters. He expresses his awakening (which happens with the help of the other sister) in a magnificent solo.”

Brad Baron is excellent as the kind-hearted editor who first tells Ruth to go home—a million kids like her come to New York to seek their fortunes—and later stands up for her. His voice is deep and expressive in ‘What A Waste,’ ‘A Quiet Girl,’ and ‘It’s Love.'”
The Falmouth Enterprise, CLOC 'Wonderful Town'

As the Pirate King, Brad Baron brandished his role with presence to spare.”

Brad Baron’s Pirate King has a…wonderful nuanced acting style that keeps everything moving along in Bristol fashion.”

“The farcical tone of the show is set immediately when Artie — played by Brad Baron — speaks directly to the audience in a humorous and self-referential manner. An introduction to the funniest character in the play, Artie’s mistress Bunny — Olivia Stoker — follows. Baron and Stoker make a fantastic on-stage pair. Baron plays the part of an ambitious songwriter stuck in New York City. His life seems relatively ordinary until the audience is introduced to the characters around him. Stoker does a phenomenal job acting as his flamboyant neighbor-cum-mistress who dreams of Hollywood and provides effective comic relief with her clever dialogue. …the end manages to reel it all in with an poignant last scene between Artie and Bananas. Baron and [Lily Akerman] powerfully portray the frustration and suffering of their lives and leave the audience on a thought-provoking note. ‘The House of Blue Leaves’ is great entertainment with clever humor, fantastic sets and exceptional acting.”

 

Playing the part of the General is Brad Baron, whose deep voice proves he’s got the most bravado of the show.”

Mr. Baron is perfect as Miles Gloriosus, who arrives home demanding his bride in a grand, full chorus number called, ‘Bring Me My Bride,’ while Pseudolus tries to trick him into relinquishing Philia.”

Brad Baron was splendidly annoying as Reginald Bunthorne. He is affectedly dainty and completely contrived with his ‘morbid love of admiration.’ His prancing made for many laugh-out-loud moments.”

Brad Baron always stands out in the CLOC crowd because of his height and long limbs, and dramatic persona of the popular poet. His voice is also terrific.”

Mr. Baron and Mr. Wasserman are hilarious as the two poets, from their foppish dress, to their dancing and prancing, to their over-the-top narcissism.”

As romantic lead Sky Masterson, Brad Baron projects a suave, ladies’ man demeanor. Yet he reveals that the charismatic gambler is a decent guy underneath. Baron’s smooth voice shines in ‘My Time of Day.'”

Standouts are Brad Baron and Jessie Muni as second-class passengers Edgar and Alice Beane.”

“Wilfred Shadbolt, the head jailor/assistant tormentor, arrives. Besotted with Phoebe, he is jealous of her love for Col. Fairfax. Brad Baron is outstanding in this role, creating a multi-faceted Wilfred, who yearns for Phoebe and for the life of a jester. He is a buffoon at times, but he is also a loyal lover, and an able negotiator. His pantomime, in this scene with Phoebe, of the impending death of Col. Fairfax brings much laughter, and he continues to amuse throughout the show.”
The Falmouth Enterprise, CLOC's 'The Yeomen of the Guard'